Ridding Yourself of Self-Doubt

Even the most self-assured person has lapses of self-doubt.

And many others have more self-doubt than confidence.

For that occasional bout of self-doubt, insert work ethic for ability.

When we get a pang of self-doubt it has very little to do with our ability and everything to do with fear of failure.

Replace that fear with a vow to outwork everyone to assure your success.

Replacing fear thoughts with promises to outwork all replaces negative thinking with positive thinking.

Doubt kills more dreams than failure.

“Make sure your worst enemy is not living between your own ears”

Subscribe to these Day Starters for free here.

Share them with friends and family by forwarding this email or posting to social media.

Don’t want to get these emails anymore?  Choose the link below to unsubscribe.

+ Comment on this post

6 Ways to Balance Career vs. Family

Everyone wants it all, but few attain it.

Whatever ALL really is.

So handling a career and family at the same time can be challenging.

Balance is important but employers often have a way of bending those boundaries and families have ways of increasing the time you are needed.

  • Smartphones are beautiful things at work but toxic when children and spouses need you in person.  Phones off.  No exceptions.
  • The time you spend 100% present with family members and children is more valuable than the gross number of hours.  Lean in.
  • Children need boundaries and many career-oriented men and women blur the lines out of guilt or convenience.
  • Eat dinner together – always.  Phones off – yours.
  • Prepare and clean up dinner together.
  • Become a better listener.  This occurs when you can hear what someone else says and say it back to them.

When I got divorced I saw a child counselor who gave me the best advice in our first session together.

She said, “Your job is not to put on a show for your children, just make them part of your life even if it is mundane and boring”.

Redefine having it all from being able to be fully actualized in your work and in your family and personal life to being happy with a life that you consciously work to keep in balance.

Subscribe to these Day Starters for free here.

Share them with friends and family by forwarding this email or posting to social media.

Don’t want to get these emails anymore?  Choose the link below to unsubscribe.

+ Comment on this post

How To Be Appreciated

On the first day as program director of a Philadelphia radio station, I faced this crisis.

The person whose job was to prepare and type the commercial logs required by the FCC under the station’s license was fired at the end of the day – not by me, but by the general manager without asking me (a bad radio management practice that unfortunately continues to this day).

She was fuming.

I was taken aback and very apologetic.  I told her the weekend logs looked perfect to me but she was so hurt and so shocked that she ripped them up.  Keep in mind that they were not computerized at the time which means they had to be retyped.

That left me with the huge task of having to retype these legal documents for the rest of the night Friday and all-day Saturday and Sunday which meant that I spent my first weekend as the station’s program director doing a sales job all weekend long.

On Monday, I dragged my tired body into the station ready to beg this person to come back if the station would only let me rehire her and of course they wouldn’t.

The hard work tired me but didn’t kill me.

What did bother me was that no one – not the manager or anyone at the station thanked me for spending the weekend cleaning up this mess.

Being appreciated means being acknowledged.

I vowed to remember that in the years to come by doing what my employers forgot to do – I thanked myself – and it felt so good.

Never let your job well done go unappreciated by the most important person in your life – YOU!

Subscribe to these Day Starters for free here.

Share them with friends and family by forwarding this email or posting to social media.

Don’t want to get these emails anymore?  Choose the link below to unsubscribe.

+ Comment on this post

The Litmus Test for a Good Friendship

Back then I never gave a second’s thought to what made the best friend I ever had, Jimmy Weinraub, such a good friend.

Now that he is gone much too early, I have figured it out.

It was like we both had a clock inside of us and knew when to reach out to each other.

Too much time never went by no matter where we were – we were always connected.

And we didn’t just text or email – he would never have liked that – we spent face time together.

One of us always knew when we needed to contact the other.

It was automatic. You could set your Apple Watch by it.

We didn’t just huff and puff about how busy we were and how work and family was so stressful, we always made time to eat together and look each other in the eye.

Jimmy always – and I mean always – followed up with a note of gratitude for as long as we knew each other to thank me for my time and enclose something inspirational or motivational (we were both Dale Carnegie instructors so that was like crack to us).

Our friendship was not just another entry in Outlook or iCal, it was celebrated in spirit and in person on a very regular basis.

I may never know another friend like this in my life, but it has taught me this much.

The litmus test for a good friendship is not how long you spend planning to be together but how many moments you actually spend together.

Subscribe to these Day Starters for free here.

Share them with friends and family by forwarding this email or posting to social media.

Don’t want to get these emails anymore? Choose the link below to unsubscribe.

+ Comment on this post

Ageism

The Washington Post did an interesting piece on how baby boomers are losing their battle against ageism.

But Millennials roughly 18-34 years old are also fighting ageism from the other direction.  They were born into an economy that left many of them unemployed or under-employed.

Today Millennials are still facing age discrimination in that they find it hard to get full-time jobs with benefits.  So ageism either has nothing to do with age or something to do with age for everyone.

The best gauges for hiring are …

  1. Does this person have the passion and skills for the job.
  2. Do they get along with others easily.
  3. Can they motivate others to bring out their best.
  4. Do they have impeccable integrity.

Therefore, in planning to seek or change employment, concentrating on these four things makes you more attractive.

Emphasize your passion for the job and the skills that you possess to be successful.

Show confirmable results of how you get along well with others.

Likewise show specific examples corroborated by others that you are a motivator of people.

And let your integrity show through with meaningful examples in the words of others not you.

It is harder to discriminate against anyone offering a proposition as impressive as this.

“Ageism works in both directions” – Alanis Morissette

Subscribe to these Day Starters for free here.

Share them with friends and family by forwarding this email or posting to social media.

Don’t want to get these emails anymore?  Choose the link below to unsubscribe.

+ Comment on this post