Multitasking

It’s wrong and it’s unnecessary.

One of the many reasons 52% of the people between the age of 19 and 39 – Millennials – feel an overwhelming sense of anxiety as their number one health complaint.  And it’s surely not limited to that age group.

When you are doing two things at once, you have failed to prioritize.

More doesn’t mean more efficient.

When I asked a class of students if they’d like to learn how to accomplish more by doing less, only one student out of 44 reluctantly said yes (she felt sorry for the professor, no doubt).

The answer is to prioritize.

What’s most important and then what’s second most important.

What may be important someday.

Human nature is such that we work on what’s easiest to do without regard to whether it is most important.

This is the year to stop multitasking and start prioritizing.

Just because we have tools in our hands that allow us to do many things at once does not mean that it makes us any more productive or happier.

Subscribe to these Day Starters for free here.

Share them with friends and family by forwarding this email or posting to Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram and other social media with my permission.

Read some sample chapters of my book Out of Bad Comes Good, The Advantages of Disadvantages here.

Don’t want to get these emails anymore?  Unsubscribe below.

+ Comment on this post

Being Yourself

February marked the 50th anniversary of Mister Rogers Neighborhood on PBS.

Yes, Mister Rogers – the gentle man that comedians poked fun at who would probably be welcomed with open arms were he alive today.

He is known famously for “I like you just the way you are”.

That powerful phrase means little unless we make a conscious choice to try to accept others – and ourselves – as the good people we are.

There is too much emphasis on change.

And we can never change another person – only fools think that.

But to begin to start accepting others and ourselves for the good things we are is a positive way forward.

Every teacher knows that you cannot force a student to learn no matter how good the instruction.

But you can build a desire to learn.

Same is true of accepting people for what they are.

They can always change but that is up to them.  We can only inspire.

To begin liking people “just the way you are”, be on the lookout for good in others.

Then look in the mirror and repeat.

We have little trouble knowing our faults, can we consciously start looking for our many strengths.

Subscribe to these Day Starters for free here.

Share them with friends and family by forwarding this email or posting to Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram and other social media with my permission.

Read some sample chapters of my book Out of Bad Comes Good, The Advantages of Disadvantages here.

Don’t want to get these emails anymore?  Unsubscribe below.

+ Comment on this post

Being Right

Did you ever notice that when people say they are absolutely sure about something, they’re often not?

Being that sure is not necessarily a good thing.

When we’re that certain it should be the first indication to step back and recheck the facts.

Passion, emotion and the will to prevail often makes us see things that are not really there.

Instead of “I’m sure”, try hedging your bet and saying “I’m sure going to check”.

And when others say it, proceed with caution.

Subscribe to these Day Starters for free here.

Share them with friends and family by forwarding this email or posting to Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram and other social media with my permission.

Read some sample chapters of my book Out of Bad Comes Good, The Advantages of Disadvantages here.

Don’t want to get these emails anymore?  Unsubscribe below.

+ Comment on this post

Believing in Yourself

It is not possible to ask others to believe in you, until you believe in yourself.

You must go first.

If others have to believe in you before you start the process, you will always be codependent to their cheerleading and encouragement.

Encouragement is not a bad thing.

It’s just not a substitution for taking the first leap that says – I believe in me.

I believe I can do it.

Subscribe to these Day Starters for free here.

Share them with friends and family by forwarding this email or posting to Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram and other social media with my permission.

Read some sample chapters of my book Out of Bad Comes Good, The Advantages of Disadvantages here.

Don’t want to get these emails anymore? Unsubscribe below.

+ Comment on this post

Risk Taking

As analytics increasingly permeate sports, we learn that taking risks has it benefits.

For example, in football going for it on first down or trying a two-point conversion instead of an extra point kick are analytically safer than they appear.

The Philadelphia Eagles won their first Super Bowl by aggressively betting on analytics all season – statistical evidence relating to the effectiveness of different play scenarios.

When push comes to shove in life, we often make the wrong decision to play it safe.

In essence we’re betting on losing or at least to avoid losing.

In a research study (featured in Gray Matter, New York Times), fans were asked to imagine that their team scored a touchdown but half the participants were told that they needed one point (an extra point kick) to tie the game.  The other group was told they needed a two-point conversion to tie.

Those who were told they only needed one point thought the two-point conversion was more likely to fail than the group that needed the two points to tie the game.

The same decision was thought to be riskier when it was seen as optional instead of unavoidable.

Taking risks is sometimes necessary to attain success.

Subscribe to these Day Starters for free here.

Share them with friends and family by forwarding this email or posting to Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram and other social media with my permission.

Read some sample chapters of my book Out of Bad Comes Good, The Advantages of Disadvantages here.

Don’t want to get these emails anymore?  Unsubscribe below.

+ Comment on this post