How To Win Enthusiastic Cooperation

Just recently, Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer issued an edict to her young workforce of Yahoos mandating that they cut out virtual work arrangements and start showing up in person.  

Mayer claims that the virtual arrangement is inefficient and that the work force needs to be more collaborative.

I asked Morley Winograd, author of Millennial Momentum and expert on Generation Y about whether the “collaborative” generation would respond well to Mayer’s ultimatum.

Winograd said that Yahoo should follow in the footsteps of rival Google which spent millions to expand what it calls the Googleplex campus.  In others words, Google is trying to make the workplace such a great place that people will want to show up rather than telecommute. 

Google is among only a handful of companies that understand the importance of motivating a changing work force.  Yahoo is probably under financial pressure from its lenders to cut costs and gain efficiencies, but to call their employees back to work is likely to fail.

To motivate others, we have to give them the burning desire to do that which we are asking.

Mandates no longer work. 

Threats to do it or else — as Yahoo is telling its workers — will backfire and their talent will migrate to more enlightened employers.

In fact, whether it’s work or home — with spouses, children or friends and family — making that which you are asking others to do more attractive is a virtual guarantee of cooperation.

“When we are no longer able to change a situation, we are challenged to change ourselves”  — Viktor Frankl, Mans Search for Meaning

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How NOT To Write An Angry Email

Or text message.

Or letter.

Go ahead and pound it out.  Get a load off your mind.  Tell them in no uncertain words.  Use vivid, strong and colorful language.  Give them a piece of your mind.  Don’t bother checking the spelling.

But before you hit send, save it to your outbox if it’s email, don’t hit send yet if it’s a text message and don’t mail the letter — not just yet.

Once you get it all out, here’s my secret. 

Don’t send it for 24 hours.

A day later I challenge you to review your strong message and I’ll bet you will do what I do — delete it or throw it in the trash. 

The real benefit to writing an angry letter or email is that you get your harsh feelings out to examine and consider.

The advantage to not sending it is that you don’t let those same feelings destroy relationships or further complicate them.

You can’t take it back after you hit send so hit save to save yourself from making a big mistake.

Speak when you are angry and you will make the best speech you will ever regret.

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How To Improve Communication

Marriages, families, employees and managers and almost every relationship could do better at effective communication.

Here are some things you might try because even accomplishing one of them can mean real improvement, happiness or career success:

  • When receiving the message, practice repeating it back to the sender.
     
  • If you’re the sender, use diplomacy and the best human relations skills you know to couch the way you say it.
     
  • Do that which you agree you will do or else it shows disrespect to others.
     
  • Be considerate by always keeping those with whom you communicate in the loop on latest developments.  With all the digital tools we have, there are no excuses for waiting for another person to ask you for an update.
     
  • Present problems first as an opportunity — include some solutions.
     
  • Consider the setting, time, location as part of when and how to communicate.
     
  • For problems, agree on an action step and then immediately set a time to complete what you’ve promised or to schedule a follow-up conversation.
     
  • Never put anything in an email that you can’t imagine yourself reading in a courtroom.
     
  • Use email judicially for it is often misinterpreted.  Email works best when it sticks to the facts.
     
  • Think things through before communicating — don’t be tempted by lightning fast technology in lieu of careful consideration.
     
  • No one hates a smiling face when entering into two-way talk.
     
  • There is no one winner in effective communication — everyone must truly benefit.
     
  • Never try to persuade another person without hearing them out first.
     
  • Always have an open mind.

What do you think?  

Try one today?

“Two monologues do not make a dialogue” — Jeff Daly

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Turning Code Words for Failure Into Success

“I can’t” means I won’t.

Instead say, I will.

“I failed” means I gave up.

Better to say, I’ll keep trying and learn from my failures.

“I wish” means I’m likely fantasizing.

It’s more productive to think of a wish as a firm commitment to guarantee results.

“I tried” is often code for I’m now going to stop trying.

Look at trying not as a virtue, but a continuous way of life. 

“I have no confidence” is frequently a way to say, and I’m not getting any confidence, either.  

Increased confidence begins with “yes, I can” not harboring thoughts of “no, I can’t”.

The words we tell ourselves determine the way we think.

Change the words.

Change the way you think.

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  • Words to succeed by…

Knock Out Punch For Bullies

Rebecca Marino took a break from her World Tennis Association career not because of the usual injuries that tennis imposes on a pro athlete.

But because of bulling from fans.

Marino was a rising star in tennis with an overpowering serve and a wicked forehand.  She climbed from a 192 ranking a year earlier to 38 seed by July of 2011.

But her quick ascent to stardom hit a bump in the road when Marino became the butt of cruel online and social media criticism from so-called fans.

Marino herself became addicted — not to drugs or alcohol — but to checking social media to see what harsh things these bullying fans were saying about her.  Finally, last February she took 7 months off from the sport she was so good at to deal with the insecurities she acquired from people she didn’t even know. 

Bullying is nothing new but because of social media and the ability of anyone anywhere to hurl hurtful comments at others, it is now an epidemic.  What’s worse, the bullying that used to be confined to the schoolyard or to a relationship is now open for the whole world to see.

Rebecca Marino is now back on the tennis tour but still sensitive about what is said about her.  She’s got all she can do to keep away from the criticism that is still out there on social media.  She has even returned to Twitter cautiously since giving it up during her time off.

Bullying stops when we say “no more”.

The push back doesn’t have to be physical, but it has to be forceful.  Take control of your life and don’t let anyone record hurtful messages in your psyche.

I just picture a digital chip implanted in my forehead as a visual reminder to not let anyone record negative messages in my brain. 

Marino’s advice on bullying:

“Don’t be afraid of the stigma of it, and talk about it.  There’s nothing to be ashamed of.  If you’re bullied or cyberbullied, or someone’s harassing you, it’s better to be open about it and talk to someone about it than to hold it inside.”

“When people hurt you over and over, think of them like sandpaper. They may scratch and hurt you a bit, but in the end, you end up polished and they end up useless.”  — Chris Colfer

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